Explore New Zealand

Select a region and begin your exploring! This map will give you info about all the regions of New Zealand and the wonders they have in store!
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Northland

  • North Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 2 Businesses
  • 5 people searching for jobs in this region
<blockquote>The Northland Region (Māori: Te Taitokerau, also Te HikuoteIka, 'the Tail of the Fish (of Maui)'), is one of 16 regions in New Zealand. It is, as the name suggests, the northernmost of New Zealand's administrative regions, the main centre being the city of Whangarei Northland is a beautiful place steeped in Maori history and boasting many scenic wonders.</blockquote> <p>It features golden <mark>sunny beaches, pristine forests, hidden coves and unique harbours</mark>. The clear, tranquil waters are just waiting for aquatic sports enthusiasts to start <mark>surfing, scuba diving, sailing or fishing.</mark> The water is also a haven for marine life such as dolphins, and swimmers can enjoy frolicking in close proximity with them at several locations. Northland is also where the Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840. <mark><strong>The Bay of Islands</strong> is the one of the most popular Northland destinations, featuring 144 different islands containing all types of unique flora and fauna.</mark> Over on the west coast there are giant kauri trees and vast undulating sand dunes that are forever being sculptured by the wind. The northern tip of New Zealand, known as Cape Reinga, is a rare place where one can see the waves of the Pacific Ocean and the Tasman Sea collide in a graceful dance of power and might. There is something for everyone in Northland and all visitors are welcomed with open arms and embraced by the local people. Come and see what they can offer you; it’s a place where New Zealand comes to life.</p>
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Auckland

  • North Island
  • 1 Job Listings
  • 1 Businesses
  • 21 people searching for jobs in this region
<blockquote>The 2009 Mercer Quality of Living Survey ranked Auckland in fourth place in the world on its list of desirable places to live, a notable achievement for the City of Sails, formerly known as the Queen City (now rarely used). </blockquote> <p><mark>The <strong>Auckland</strong> metropolitan area (commonly pronounced /ˈɔːk.lәnd/), is the largest and most populous urban area in the country with a population approaching <strong>1.4 million residents</strong>, <strong>31 percent</strong> of the country's population</mark>. In Māori, Auckland's name is Tāmakimakaurau, or the transliterated version of Auckland, karana. Auckland’s nickname, The City of Sails, is derived from the fact that it has the largest number of boats per capita in the world. The beautiful waterways around it offer yacht races, highspeed boat rides and cruises around the harbour. The beaches are both golden sand fringed by native pohutakawa trees and there’s also black sand shoreline. There is a vibrant and exciting nightlife in the city that will accommodate all tastes and style. Across the <strong>Hauraki Gulf</strong> there are 50 islands that are sure to feed the soul. West Auckland provides a beautiful forest with running streams and towering trees, providing a peaceful retreat from the bustling city. Whether one wants to enjoy the activities on offer in the nation’s biggest city or take advantage of the natural attributes for which New Zealand is famous, then Auckland is a definite hot spot for the adventurous soul!</p>
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Waikato

  • North Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 3 people searching for jobs in this region
<blockquote>The region gets its name from the Waikato River; waikato is a Māori word meaning flowing water and this area is home to the Waikato iwi (tribe). With coasts on the western and northeastern sides of the North Island, the region stretches from Lake Taupo and northern King Country in the south, north to the Coromandel Peninsula. It is bounded by Auckland in the north, Bay of Plenty in the east, Hawke's Bay in the southeast, and ManawatuWanganui and Taranaki in the south.</blockquote> <p>The landscapes you will come across in the <strong>Waikato</strong> will forever linger in your memory. There’s pure tranquillity above ground and the most astonishing adventures below, Waikato is the first region south of Greater Auckland. <mark>Above ground the view is dominated by the lifeforce of the region, the <strong>Waikato River</strong>, and the surrounding rolling lush, green farmland</mark>. The main centre is Hamilton, a city that serves the flourishing farming and university community. From the d ecko f a classic paddle steamer you can view the mighty Waikato, at 425km the longest river in New Zealand. Absorb one of the region’s best experiences aboard the steamer with a wonderful commentary on local landmarks, the history of the region and riverbank life. <mark><strong>Hamilton</strong> is famous for its themed gardens and the local zoo,</mark> which has the largest free flight aviary in the Southern Hemisphere. Te Aroha is renowned for its <mark>relaxing hot mineral pools</mark> and Cambridge for its antiques arts and crafts. In the Waitomo area, south of Hamilton, there's a natural wonderland to explore. <mark>Massive underground caverns are adorned with glistening stalactites and stalagmites</mark>, formations that have been millions of years in the making. You can glide through the darkness on a water barge and admire the wonders of nature where the glowworms overhead sparkle like an eerie underground sky. For a change of pace visit the West Coast beach town of Raglan, which is known throughout the international surfing community for its amazing lefthand break. There are many New Zealand musicians and artists here who find it irresistible and love the laidback lifestyle. The region’s natural attractions are crowned by <mark>New Zealand’s largest lake, <strong>Lake Taupo</strong>, a mecca for holidaymakers, boating enthusiasts and trout fishermen.</mark></p>
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Bay of Plenty

  • North Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 1 Businesses
  • 4 people searching for jobs in this region
The colourful name "Bay of Plenty" was coined by British voyager James Cook during his 1769–70 exploration of New Zealand, who noted the abundant resources in the area at several Māori villages. This was in stark contrast to the earlier observations he had made in Poverty Bay. The Māori name for the bay is Te MoanaaToi ("the sea of Toi"), a reference to the ancestral explorer Toitehuatahi. The Bay of Plenty is on the northern coast of New Zealand's North Island. It stretches from the Coromandel Peninsula in the west to Cape Runaway in the east, a wide stretch of some 259km of open coastline. The Bay of Plenty Region is centreed on this body of water, which incorporates several large islands. The Bay of Plenty lies east of the KaimaiMamaku ranges and south of the Coromandel Peninsula, making it the fifthmost populous region in New Zealand. </br></br> One of New Zealand’s most popular h oliday destinations, with picturesque harbours, long white surf beaches, plus an easygoing lifestyle, this is a great area to visit and spend some time. With a beautiful natural harbour, Tauranga is a thriving commercial centre with a cosmopolitan lifestyle that has many wonderful cafes and restaurants for visitors and locals with an enthusiasm for good food and w ine. Two large marinas in Tauranga hold over a thousand yachts and launches, and there are numerous charter b oat operators. Thousands of visitors come each year to the Bay of Plenty, attracted by its beautiful beaches and deep sea f ishing. This region is blessed with a mild climate year round so horticulture flourishes and the region’s proximity to the sea makes seafood a local specialty.
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Gisborne

  • North Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 1 people searching for jobs in this region
Eastland (Gisborne) The Māori name for the Gisborne region is Tairawhiti the coast upon which the sun shines across the water. Gisborne is named for an early Colonial Secretary, William Gisborne. Eastland is the name of the region. On the e ast coast of of the North Island is an area also known as the East Cape, a secluded, natural place offering a unique experience for those want to see the true New Zealand. Kaiti Beach at Gisborne was where the Maori immigrational waka, Horouta, landed and the beach was also the first landing place in New Zealand for Europeans. </br></br> Eastland is a wild and enchanting place full of ancient stories. Catch the first sunrise of the world's new day and explore a coast that few people know well. Eastland reaches out to the Pacific Ocean, and is the first mainland place in the world to see the sun each day. Gisborne is one of the sunniest spots in New Zealand with average yearly sunshine of around 2200 hours. The city is the main centre of Eastland, which is known for its subtropical summers with the long hours of sunshine. Visitors can enjoy a fantastic combination of vibrant cafes and excellent surfing. There's a wonderfully fresh quality to the scenery of Eastland. It is a great base for visitors wanting to explore the bush and forest parks, with walks ranging anywhere from halfanhour to four days. One of the most stunning areas for hiking and trekking is in the Te Urewera National Park, the third biggest national park and the largest area of untouched native forest in New Zealand. This is a land of bushfringed misty mountains, lakes and beaches that has remained virtually unchanged for hundreds of years. Even the region’s farmland and vineyards breathe the spirit of nature. </br></br> Gisborne is a city where you can indulge in gourmet dining and w ine tasting as the area is one of New Zealand’s largest grapegrowing regions with a number of awardwinning wineries and vineyards.
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Hawke's Bay

  • North Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 0 people searching for jobs in this region
Hawke’s Bay (Māori: Heretaunga) is a region on the east coast of the North Island of New Zealand and is recognised on the world stage for its awardwinning wines. </br></br> Hawke's Bay is a charismatic region where you can enjoy stylish historical a rchitecture and wine in equal quantities.The region is situated on the Pacific coast of the North Island and based on a large semicircular bay which extends for 100 kilometres from from Mahia Peninsula to Cape Kidnappers. The Hawke's Bay region includes the hilly coastal land around the northern and central bay, the floodplains of the Wairoa River in the north, the wide fertile Heretaunga Plains around Hastings in the south, and a hilly interior stretching up into the Kaweka and Ruahine ranges. The region consists of Wairoa District, Hastings District, Napier City, and Central Hawke's Bay District, as well as the town of Taharua in Taupo District and the town of Ngamatea in Rangitikei District. One trivial fact is that the region has a hill with the longest place name in the world, according to the 2009 Guinness Book of Records Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapikimaungahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu is an unremarkable hill in souther Hawke's Bay, not far from Waipukurau. B lessed with a sunny, Mediterraneanstyle climate, Hawke's Bay is one of New Zealand's warmest, driest regions with landscapes that start in the high, forested Ruahine and Kaweka ranges and slope down towards the coast, flattening out to become the Heretaunga Plains. A number of wide rivers run swiftly to meet the blue Pacific Ocean. The twin cities of Napier and Hastings are the main population centres.
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Taranaki

  • North Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 0 people searching for jobs in this region
Taranaki In the Maori language, Taranaki means 'Gliding Peak', a name that reflects the legend of how the mountain came to its present location. The story is Taranaki once lived with theN orth Island' s other great volcanoes (Tongariro, Ruapehu and Ngauruhoe) but was banished for falling in love with Tongariro's wife, a smaller volcano called Pihanga. Taranaki went west towards the setting sun and carved out the Whanganui River as he went. </br></br> Create wonderful memories in Taranaki on the mountain, in the water, exploring gardens or viewing the invigorating art. This is a lush, beautiful region of vivid greenery and spectacular beaches on the North Island's west coast. It is situated halfway between Auckland and W ellington. Mount Taranaki, a wonderfully, dramatic volcanic cone with a snowy top, looms over the region. It is the second highest mountain in the North Island. The mountain is a spiritual and physical force and is the source of over 50 rivers and streams, and the subject of many stories and legends. In 1642, explorer Abel Tasman said it was "the noblest hill I’ve ever seen". The main centre of the Taranaki region is the city of New Plymouth, which has been voted the "Top City" in New Zealand. Taranaki is situated on the west coast of the North Island, surrounding the volcanic peak. The large bays northwest and southwest of Cape Egmont are named the North Taranaki Bight and the South Taranaki Bight.. Mount Taranaki, a nearperfect cone, last e rupted in the mid18th century. The mountain and its immediate surrounds form Egmont National Park. Although Māori had called the mountain Taranaki for many centuries, Captain James Cook renamed it Egmont after the Earl of Egmont the recently retired First Lord of the Admiralty who had encouraged his expedition. That name appeared on maps until the 1980s when it was ruled the official name was to be either "Mount Taranaki or Mount Egmont".
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Whanganui

  • North Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 0 people searching for jobs in this region
<blockquote> Legends emphasise the importance of the Whanganui river, and it remains sacred to Whanganui iwi. </blockquote> <p><strong>Manawatu-Wanganui</strong> is a region in the lower half of the North Island of New Zealand, around the city of Palmerston North and the town of Wanganui. The district is dominated and defined by two significant rivers, the <mark>Whanganui (290 km)</mark>, and the <mark>Manawatu (182 km)</mark>. <mark>The Whanganui River is the longest navigable river in New Zealand</mark>. Legends emphasise the importance of the river and it remains sacred to Whanganui iwi. The region is a major agricultural power, leading in beef, sheep and deer production. Farm stays allow visitors to experience life on a New Zealand farm, not to mention some excellent country cooking. The Manawatu-Wanganui region takes up a large proportion of the lower half of the North Island. It is the second-largest region in the North Island and the sixth-largest in New Zealand; totalling 22,215 km2 (8.1% of New Zealand's land area). </p> <p>The region stretches from north of Taumarunui to south of Levin on the west coast, and across to the east coast from Cape Turnagain to Owhanga. It borders the Waikato, Taranaki, Hawke's Bay and Wellington regions and includes river catchment areas that run from the volcanic plateau to the sea. The Pacific Ocean is the eastern boundary and the Ruahine Ranges form a natural boundary between the region and Hawke's Bay. Within the region’s boundaries is the tallest mountain in the North Island, Mount Ruapehu. An active volcano, it is 2,797m high. During the last 100 years Ruapehu has experienced six significant eruptions, and last erupted in 1995 and 1996.</p>
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Wellington

  • North Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 11 people searching for jobs in this region
Wellington or Te Upoko-o-te-Ika-a-Māui, meaning The Head of the Fish of Māui (often shortened to Te Upoko-o-te-Ika), a traditional name for the southernmost part of the North Island, derives from the legend of the fishing up of the island by the demigod Māui. Nickname(s): Wellywood, the Windy City, Welly. Wellington is at the south-western tip of the North Island on Cook Strait, the passage that separates the North and South Islands. On a clear day the snowcapped Kaikoura Ranges are visible to the south across the strait. To the north are the golden beaches of the Kapiti Coast. On the east the Rimutaka Range divides Wellington from the broad plains of the Wairarapa, a wine region of national acclaim. With a latitude of 41° 17' S, Wellington is the southernmost national capital city in the world. It is more densely populated than most other settlements in New Zealand, due to the small amount of building space available between the harbour and the surrounding hills. The city is the third most populous urban area of New Zealand as Wellington has very few suitable areas in which to expand and this has resulted in the development of the surrounding cities in the greater urban area. With its exposure to intense winds coming through Cook Strait, the city gained the nickname Windy Wellington. Wellington was named after Arthur Wellesley, the first Duke of Wellington and victor of the Battle of Waterloo. The Duke's title comes from the town of Wellington in the English county of Somerset. In its most restrictive definition, the Wellington Region covers just the four territorial authorities in the region with city status: Lower Hutt, Porirua, Upper Hutt and Wellington.Wellington's charm is that it serves up a vibrant inner city experience with a slice of New Zealand scenery as it is surrounded by hills, a rugged coastline and a stunning harbour.
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Marlborough

  • South Island
  • 3 Job Listings
  • 3 Businesses
  • 7 people searching for jobs in this region
<blockquote>Marlborough is located in the north-east of the South Island and is a unitary authority, both a region and a district, with its council located at Blenheim. Marlborough is known for its dry climate, the picturesque Marlborough Sounds and sauvignon blanc wine. </blockquote> <p><strong>The Marlborough region</strong> is situated due west of Wellington, across Cook Strait. <mark>Blessed with a wonderful sunny climate that regularly records the highest sunshine hours in New Zealand</mark>. Marlborough is the country's <mark>largest grape-growing and wine-making region with 65 wineries, 290 grape growers and 4,054 hectares in grape production, most of which are very close to Blenheim and Picton</mark>. This is a wonderful area with so many things on offer, from the <strong>Marlborough Sounds</strong> and valleys that are home to all kinds of wildlife to <strong>Queen Charlotte</strong>, Kenepuru and Pelorus sounds, which can be explored by <mark>boat, ferry, runabout, luxury charter launch or kayak from Picton or Havelock</mark>. Both are great towns from which to explore or base yourself. Fantastic diving can be found everywhere in the Sounds or you can admire the spectacular scenery during stunning walks in the bush. The scenery is spectacular as the mountains rise straight from the sea and crystal waters entice you for a swim. The Marlborough region is a place where you can do just about anything - <mark>from outdoor adventures, to wine tastings around some of the world’s best vineyards</mark>. Or you can check out some fantastic arts and crafts, history and gardens or marine pursuits.</p>
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Nelson

  • South Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 1 people searching for jobs in this region
Nelson's Māori name, Whakatū, means 'build', 'raise', or 'establish'. Nelson is one of the few New Zealand cities to have its own flag. The city of Nelson was named after Admiral Lord Nelson of Battle of Trafalgar fame. With the sun shining most days and with its enjoyable and beautiful environment, there are many good reasons to visit the Nelson region and get acquainted with the creative local culture. Situated in the north-west corner of the South Island, the Nelson region is surrounded by sheltering mountain ranges giving it a Mediterranean-type climate with golden beaches, national parks, boutique wineries, micro breweries and a large creative community of working artists. There is a wonderful feeling about Nelson that combines a stress-free approach to life. Unlike many towns and cities in New Zealand, Nelson has retained many Victorian buildings in its historic centre and a whole street has been designated as having heritage value: South Street. Nelson is surrounded by mountains on three sides with Tasman Bay on the other and the region is the gateway to Abel Tasman National Park, Kahurangi National Park and Lakes Rotoiti and Rotoroa in the Nelson Lakes National Park. With eco-tourism and adventure tourism in the ascendency, the area is highly rated among caving enthusiasts. There are several prominent cave systems around Takaka Hill and Mounts Owen and Arthur, which hold the largest and deepest explored caverns in the southern hemisphere. Many people believe Nelson has the best climate in New Zealand, as it regularly tops the national statistics for sunshine hours, with an annual average total of over 2400 hours.
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Tasman

  • South Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 0 people searching for jobs in this region
The Tasman Region borders the West Coast, Marlborough and Nelson regions. It is both a region and a unitary authority, and the District Council sits at Richmond, with Community Boards serving outlying communities in Motueka and Golden Bay. Tasman Bay, the largest indentation in the north coast of the South Island, was named after Abel Tasman, the first reported European discoverer of New Zealand. It passed the name on to the adjoining district formed in 1989, largely from the merger of Waimea and Golden Bay counties. Tasman District is a large area at the top western side of the South Island. It covers 9,786 square kilometres and is bounded to the west by the Matiri Ranges, the Tasman Mountains and the Tasman Sea. To the north,Tasman and Golden bays form its seaward edge and the eastern boundary extends to the edge of Nelson city and includes part of the Spencer Mountains and the Saint Arnaud and Richmond ranges. </br></br> The Victoria Ranges form Tasman's southern boundary and the district's highest point is Mt Owen, at 1,875 metres. The landscape is diverse. From large mountainous areas to valleys and plains, sliced by such major rivers as the Bullerr, Motueka, Aorere, Takaka and Wairoa rivers. There's lush bush and bird life, golden beaches, the unique 40-kilometre sands of Farewell Spit, and boundless fishing in the bays and rivers. These assets make the district wonderfully diverse to tourists.
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West Coast

  • South Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 1 people searching for jobs in this region
<blockquote>The West Coast is one of the administrative regions of New Zealand, located on the west coast of the South Island and is one of the more remote and most sparsely populated areas of the country.</blockquote> <p>The <strong>West Coast</strong> is made up of three districts: Buller, Grey and Westland. Local towns are <strong>Westport, Greymouth</strong> and <strong>Hokitika</strong>. To New Zealanders, the West Coast of the South Island is known as “The Coast” and the people who are born there are known as “Coasters”. The term Westland is used by some New Zealanders to refer to the whole of the West Coast, including Grey District, Buller District, and Fiordland. Fiordland is geographically on the west coast of New Zealand but has no road connection and is in the Southland administrative region. The term West Coast generally refers to the narrow strip of land between the Southern Alps and the Tasman Sea. It is the longest region in New Zealand. The region reaches from Kahurangi Point in the north to Awarua Point in the south, a distance of 600 km. To the west is the Tasman Sea which like the Southern Ocean is known to be very rough, with four-metre swells being common), and to the east are the Southern Alps. Much of the land is rugged, although there are coastal plains around which much of the population resides. The region has a very high rainfall due to the prevailing northwesterly winds and the location of the Southern Alps - these two elements giving rise to heavy rains. The flip side to this is the rain shadow effect which is responsible for the relatively arid climate of the Canterbury Plains on the other side of the Southern Alps.</p>
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Canterbury

  • South Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 0 people searching for jobs in this region
The New Zealand region of Canterbury (Māori: Waitaha) is mainly composed of the Canterbury Plains and the surrounding mountains. Its main city, Christchurch, hosts the main office of the Christchurch City Council, the Canterbury Regional Council (EnvironmentCanterbury) and the University of Canterbury. </br></br> People in New Zealand commonly refer to people from the Canterbury region as Cantabrians. Coastal and mountain experiences combine to make Canterbury a place where there's something for every traveller. Here you'll find many wonderful things to enjoy within one region. The Canterbury Region includes a large central portion of the east coast of the South Island, centred on the city of Christchurch. From the wonderful sandy beaches on the coast to the rugged peaks of the Southern Alps, the Canterbury scenery is fantastic. Panoramic views are everywhere from the ocean to the mountains. Great areas of pastureland are criss-crossed with a palette of colours and amazing clouds punctuate the vast amount of sky. The highest point in the region is spectacular Aoraki/Mount Cook, New Zealand’s highest mountain, which stands at 3,754 metres (Aoraki is Maori for Cloud Piercer). At the other end of the scale, the submarine trenches off the coast of Kaikoura are thousands of metres deep, providing an ideal environment for the whales, dolphins and seals that live there. Canterbury is New Zealand's largest region, with an area of 45,346km².
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Christchurch

  • South Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 3 people searching for jobs in this region
<blockquote>Christchurch (Māori: Ōtautahi) is the largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the country's second-largest urban area. It is one third the way down the South Island's east coast, just north of Banks Peninsula. Christchurch is also known as the Garden City and is alive with colour, atmosphere, world-class attractions and spectacular gardens. The city has a vibrant, cosmopolitan feel that embraces exciting festivals, theatre, modern art galleries and great shopping. With much of the city being flat and only a few metres above sea level, spectacular views can be obtained from almost any high building. At these low elevations the city appears more like a forest, with only a few buildings visible, rather than a major city.</blockquote> <p><strong>Christchurch</strong> has a population of just under 360,000 and with many <mark>beautiful parks and gardens glowing with flowers</mark> it has a fairytale charm. It is also a city steeped in art and education. It is the home of the <mark>University of Canterbury</mark> and has an art gallery that matches the rustic and neo-gothic buildings that line the nearby streets. All around the city there are opportunities for physical activity, such as <mark>hiking and mountain biking in the <strong>Port Hills</strong></mark>. For those with a head for heights, there is gondola ride that will take you breath away, and afterwards relaxing while punting on the Avon River will give you the chance to get it back again. The only French settlement in New Zealand is just a few kilometres away at Akoroa, a town that features <mark>exquisite dining and beautiful wines</mark>. <strong>Akaroa</strong> is the main settlement on Banks Peninsula, which contains endless rolling hills and small bays at every turn. Whatever the season there is something fun and exciting to do. Whether you are wanting to be outdoors or indoors the city of Christchurch has what you are looking for. Every day will be a new adventure and there will be something wonderful to uncover.</p>
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Otago

  • South Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 0 people searching for jobs in this region
The name "Otago" is an old southern Maori word whose North Island dialect equivalent is "Otakou" and it was introduced to the south by Europeans. "Otago" is also the old name of the European settlement on the Otago Harbour, established by the Weller Brothers in 1831. Otago is a region in the south of the South Island. It has an area of approximately 32,000 square kilometres (12,000 sq miles) making it New Zealand’s second largest region. It has a population of 205,400 from the June 2009 estimate. Soon after settlement first began, Otago became the focus of the Otago Association, an offshoot of the Free Church of Scotland, notable for its high-minded adoption of the principle that ordinary people, not the landowner, should choose the ministers. Major centres of what is now the Otago Region include Dunedin (the principal city of the region), Oamaru (made famous by author Janet Frame), Balclutha, Alexandra, and the major tourist centres Queenstown and Wanaka. Kaitangata in South Otago is a prominent source of coal. The Waitaki and Clutha rivers also provide much of the country's hydro-electric power. Some parts of the area originally covered by Otago Province are now administered as part of Southland Region.
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Queenstown

  • South Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 0 people searching for jobs in this region
<blockquote>Queenstown is an international resort town where you can enjoy every style of working holiday. The town is situated in the region of Otago, in the south of New Zealand's South Island. It is built around an inlet called Queenstown Bay on Lake Wakatipu, a long thin lake formed by glacial processes that is shaped like a staggered lightning bolt and enjoys spectacular views of nearby mountains.</blockquote> <p>The town is the largest centre in Central Otago and the third largest in Otago. In recent years, <mark>Queenstown's hotels, B&Bs, lodges and hostels have become a popular destination for tourists from all over the world.</mark> <strong>Queenstown</strong> provides <mark>adventure tourism</mark> during the day and a <mark>vibrant nightlife scene</mark> during the evenings that is a magnet for all ages and walks of life. Consequently living here is by no means cheap but you get what you pay for - and Queenstown is stunningly beautiful. Queenstown also has a reputation for being the <mark>'Adventure Capital of the World',</mark> with an alpine climate of winters that see clear blue skies contrasted against the surrounding snow-capped mountains. Summers have long warm days with temperatures that can reach 30°C. <strong>Queenstown</strong> is the ultimate cosmopolitan resort town. With <mark>views over Lake Wakatipu and the majestic Remarkables Range</mark>, it is the perfect destination all year round. Nearby historic Arrowtown is a quaint town that has been beautifully preserved. With its <mark>picturesque tree-lined streets and preserved miners' cottages,</mark> it’s a walk back to the 19th century.</p>
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Southland

  • South Island
  • 0 Job Listings
  • 0 Businesses
  • 0 people searching for jobs in this region
Southland (Māori: Murihiku) is the name of New Zealand's southernmost region and is also the name of a district within that region. Southland District covers the majority of the land area of Southland Region, although the region also covers Gore District, Invercargill City and adjacent territorial waters. It has a land area of 30,400.94 km², excluding inland waters such as Lake Te Anau, Lake Manapouri, and Lake Hauroko. Southland District contains the towns of Winton, Riverton, Lumsden and Te Anau, and the islands south of Foveaux Strait: Solander Island, Stewart Island/Rakiura (New Zealand’s third largest island) and Ruapuke Island. Two of New Zealand's largest national parks are within the boundaries of Southland District: Fiordland National Park, and Rakiura National Park (which covers most of Stewart Island/Rakiura). Southland is New Zealand's southernmost region and the lush, green pastoral lands of Southland are in strong contrast to the dryness of Central Otago further north. Throughout the Southland region are a number of accessible, tranquil waterways that attract fly-fishing enthusiasts in search of brown trout. The main city, Invercargill, is built around beautiful Queens Park, 80 hectares of gardens, wildlife and sporting fun. As well as an 18-hole golf course, the park has animal enclosures, an aviary,play areas and the Southland Museum.
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